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Few and Far Between? [electronic resource]: An Environmental Equity Analysis of the Geographic Distribution of Hazardous Waste Generation

Mark Atlas
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2002
Edition
2002-08-13
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to the general public.
Abstract
This article examines whether the generation of hazardous waste is concentrated in communities that are disproportionately minority or low-income. While much environmental equity research has focused on commercial facilities managing hazardous waste, facilities that generate and manage their own wastes -- which account for over 98 percent of hazardous waste volume -- have been ignored. The demographic characteristics were determined of people in geographic concentric rings around hazardous waste generators accounting for most of the country's 1997 hazardous waste volume. The author's analyses indicate no tendency for disproportionately minority communities to be near these facilities. In fact, relatively few people are near the locations where most hazardous waste is generated. While a few of these facilities have large numbers of minority people around them, most are in areas with higher than average white populations. There was, however, a tendency for low-income communities to be near these facilities. To the extent that there are potential risks from the presence of hazardous waste at facilities, most of this risk is in relatively unpopulated areas. The presence of hazardous waste is not concentrated in areas that are disproportionately minority or low-income.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR01260.v1
Contents
Dataset
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 1260
ICPSR (Series) 1260
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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