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A Potential Case of Social Bankruptcy [electronic resource]: States' AFDC Payments and Their Teen Birthrates

Shirley L. Zimmerman, Constance Gager
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 1998
Edition
1998-01-20
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to the general public.
Abstract
These findings were based on a pooled time series analysis that covers a 30-year period at five different time-points: 1960, 1970, 1980, 1985, and 1990. This research examines the relationship between states' Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) payments and teen birthrates. Drawing on rational choice theories, the investigators expected the effects of states' AFDC payments on their teen birthrates to be positive, taking unemployment rates, racial composition, and poverty rates into account. The effects of states' AFDC payments were significant in a negative direction in Model 1, a random effects model. They also were significant in a negative direction in Model 2 when the effects of year were controlled for. However, when the effects of year and state in Model 3 were controlled for, they were not significant. The findings do not support assumptions regarding the incentive effects of welfare that underlie rational choice theories in states where teen birthrates are higher. If anything, teen birthrates are higher in states where AFDC payments are lower. Implications for policy and further research are discussed in relation to the positive effects of states' poverty and population change rates on the state teen birthrate problem.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR01134.v1
Contents
Dataset
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 1134
ICPSR (Series) 1134
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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