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A Latent Growth Analysis of Undergraduate Degree Production

Blanchard, Rebecca D
Format
Thesis/Dissertation; Online
Author
Blanchard, Rebecca D
Advisor
Konold, Timothy
Fan, Xitao
Pusser, Brian
Breneman, David
Abstract
A theoretical framework based on prestige-maximization is used to identify four time-varying inputs in the production of undergraduate degrees at non-profit colleges and universities. The longitudinal relationship between these inputs (academic expenditures, research funding, faculty quality, and student quality) and the output (undergraduate degrees per FTE) was estimated at the institutional level between 1997 and 2007 with latent growth modeling. Separate models were estimated for institutions producing social science degrees (n=1,145) and physical science degrees (n=1,114). Collinearity diagnostics mandated the exclusion of academic expenditures; thus, interpretations of results were limited. The remaining three inputs were significantly related (p<.05) to degree production in both models, but an increase in each of these prestige-maximizing inputs did not uniformly produce increased degree rates. Note: Abstract extracted from PDF text
Language
English
Published
University of Virginia, Curry School of Education, PHD (Doctor of Philosophy), 2010
Published Date
2010-08-01
Degree
PHD (Doctor of Philosophy)
Collection
Libra ETD Repository
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