Item Details

Print View

Mother England, Mother Ireland : National Allegory and Maternal Authority in Anglo-Irish Literature and Culture, 1880-1922

Bobotis, Andrea Christina
Format
Thesis/Dissertation; Online
Author
Bobotis, Andrea Christina
Advisor
Chase Levenson, Karen
Booth, Alison
Luftig, Victor
Abstract
"Mother England, Mother Ireland" proposes a new way of reading allegories of nation-building and national identity in Anglo-Irish literature at the end of the nineteenth century. I argue that authors who claimed affiliations with both England and Ireland (Maud Gonne, Lady Augusta Gregory, Bram Stoker, and Oscar Wilde) exploited the capacity of allegory to infiltrate a range of genres and, in doing so, discovered hidden potential in the links between motherhood and motherland. Examining nonfiction, novels, drama, speeches, and public spectacles, I show how these writers adapted allegorical representations of Ireland as a mother not only to confront Ireland's vexed political and cultural relationship with England, but also to explore cross-cultural links between Ireland and Britain's outlying colonies. Note: Abstract extracted from PDF file via OCR.
Language
English
Published
University of Virginia, Department of English, PHD (Doctor of Philosophy), 2007
Published Date
2007-01-01
Degree
PHD (Doctor of Philosophy)
Notes
Digitization of this thesis was made possible by a generous grant from the Jefferson Trust, 2015. Thesis originally deposited on 2016-03-14 in version 1.28 of Libra. This thesis was migrated to Libra2 on 2017-03-23 16:36:32.
Collection
Libra ETD Repository
In CopyrightIn Copyright
▾See more
▴See less

Availability

Read Online