Item Details

Flight Investigation of an Automatic Pitchup Control

by George J. Hurt, Jr., and James B. Whitten
Format
Book; Government Document; Online; EBook
Published
Washington, [D.C.] : National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1960.
Language
English
Series
NASA Technical Note
Summary
A flight investigation of an automatic pitchup control has been conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Langley Research Center. The pitching-moment characteristics of a transonic fighter airplane which was subject to pitchup were altered by driving the stabilizer in accordance with a signal that was a function of a combination of the measured angle of attack and the pitching velocity. An angle-of-attack threshold control was used to preset the angle of attack at which the automatic pitchup-control system would begin to drive the stabilizer. No threshold control as such existed for the pitching-velocity signal. A summing linkage in series with the pilot's longitudinal control allowed the automatic pitchup-control system to drive the stabilizer 13.5 percent of the total stabilizer travel independently of the pilot's control. Tests were made at an altitude of 35,000 feet over a Mach number range of 0.80 to 0.90. Various gearings between the control and the sensing devices were investigated. The automatic system was capable of extending the region of positive stability for the test airplane to angles of attack above the basic-airplane pitchup threshold angle of attack. In most cases a limit-cycle oscillation about the airplane pitch axis occurred.
Description
27 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Mode of access: Internet.
Notes
  • "NASA TN D-114."
  • "Langley Research Center, Langley Field, Va."
  • "August 1960."
  • Title from cover.
  • Includes bibliographical references (p. 13).
Series Statement
NASA technical note ; D-114
Other Forms
Also available online from the NASA Technical Reports Server (http://ntrs.nasa.gov/). Address as of 12/11/06: http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19980227095_1998381837.pdf.
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Technical Details

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    a| Flight investigation of an automatic pitchup control / c| by George J. Hurt, Jr., and James B. Whitten.
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    a| Washington, [D.C.] : b| National Aeronautics and Space Administration, c| 1960.
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    a| 27 p. : b| ill. ; c| 26 cm.
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    a| NASA technical note ; v| D-114
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    a| "NASA TN D-114."
    500
      
      
    a| "Langley Research Center, Langley Field, Va."
    500
      
      
    a| "August 1960."
    500
      
      
    a| Title from cover.
    504
      
      
    a| Includes bibliographical references (p. 13).
    520
      
      
    a| A flight investigation of an automatic pitchup control has been conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Langley Research Center. The pitching-moment characteristics of a transonic fighter airplane which was subject to pitchup were altered by driving the stabilizer in accordance with a signal that was a function of a combination of the measured angle of attack and the pitching velocity. An angle-of-attack threshold control was used to preset the angle of attack at which the automatic pitchup-control system would begin to drive the stabilizer. No threshold control as such existed for the pitching-velocity signal. A summing linkage in series with the pilot's longitudinal control allowed the automatic pitchup-control system to drive the stabilizer 13.5 percent of the total stabilizer travel independently of the pilot's control. Tests were made at an altitude of 35,000 feet over a Mach number range of 0.80 to 0.90. Various gearings between the control and the sensing devices were investigated. The automatic system was capable of extending the region of positive stability for the test airplane to angles of attack above the basic-airplane pitchup threshold angle of attack. In most cases a limit-cycle oscillation about the airplane pitch axis occurred.
    530
      
      
    a| Also available online from the NASA Technical Reports Server (http://ntrs.nasa.gov/). Address as of 12/11/06: http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19980227095_1998381837.pdf.
    538
      
      
    a| Mode of access: Internet.
    650
      
    7
    a| Aerodynamic coefficients. 2| nasat
    650
      
    7
    a| Lift. 2| nasat
    650
      
    7
    a| Control surfaces. 2| nasat
    650
      
    7
    a| Stabilizers (fluid dynamics) 2| nasat
    650
      
    7
    a| Maneuverability. 2| nasat
    650
      
    7
    a| Angle of attack. 2| nasat
    650
      
    7
    a| Transonic flight. 2| nasat
    650
      
    7
    a| Aircraft design. 2| nasat
    650
      
    7
    a| Longitudinal control. 2| nasat
    650
      
    7
    a| Stability tests. 2| nasat
    650
      
    7
    a| Automatic control. 2| nasat
    650
      
    7
    a| Fighter aircraft. 2| nasat
    650
      
    7
    a| Pitching moments. 2| nasat
    700
    1
      
    a| Whitten, James B.
    710
    2
      
    a| Langley Research Center.
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    b| UIU c| UIUC d| 20141113 s| google u| uiug.30112106742528 y| 1960 r| pd q| bib

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