Item Details

Effect of Simulated Space Radiation on Selected Optical Materials

by C.A. Nicoletta and A.G. Eubanks
Format
Book; Government Document; Online; EBook
Published
Washington, D.C. : National Aeronautics and Space Administration ; [Springfield, Va. : For sale by the National Technical Information Service], 1972.
Language
English
Series
NASA Technical Note
Summary
The effect of simulated Nimbus spacecraft orbital (1100 km, circular, and polar) radiation on wide bandpass glass filters, narrow bandpass thin film interference filters, and several fused silicas was determined by transmittance measurements over the 200 to 3400 nanom wavelength region. No changes were observed in the filters, which were shielded with fused silica during irradiation, after exposure to a 1-year equivalent orbital dose of electrons, nor in the fused silicas after the same electron exposure plus a 1-year equivalent dose of protons. Exposure to a 1/2-year equivalent dose of solar ultraviolet radiation caused a significant degradation in the transmittance of two ultraviolet-transmitting interference filters but had no effect on two colored glass filters that transmitted in the visible and near infrared regions. As a result of the ultraviolet exposure the fused silicas exhibited losses of several percent over the 200- to 300 nanom wavelength region.
Description
iii, 14 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Mode of access: Internet.
Notes
  • Prepared at Goddard Space Flight Center.
  • Cover title.
  • Bibliography: p. 14.
Series Statement
NASA technical note ; NASA TN D-6758
Logo for Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details

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    a| Effect of simulated space radiation on selected optical materials c| by C.A. Nicoletta and A.G. Eubanks.
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    a| Washington, D.C. : b| National Aeronautics and Space Administration ; a| [Springfield, Va. : b| For sale by the National Technical Information Service], c| 1972.
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    a| iii, 14 p. : b| ill. ; c| 27 cm.
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    a| NASA technical note ; v| NASA TN D-6758
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    a| Prepared at Goddard Space Flight Center.
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    a| Bibliography: p. 14.
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    a| The effect of simulated Nimbus spacecraft orbital (1100 km, circular, and polar) radiation on wide bandpass glass filters, narrow bandpass thin film interference filters, and several fused silicas was determined by transmittance measurements over the 200 to 3400 nanom wavelength region. No changes were observed in the filters, which were shielded with fused silica during irradiation, after exposure to a 1-year equivalent orbital dose of electrons, nor in the fused silicas after the same electron exposure plus a 1-year equivalent dose of protons. Exposure to a 1/2-year equivalent dose of solar ultraviolet radiation caused a significant degradation in the transmittance of two ultraviolet-transmitting interference filters but had no effect on two colored glass filters that transmitted in the visible and near infrared regions. As a result of the ultraviolet exposure the fused silicas exhibited losses of several percent over the 200- to 300 nanom wavelength region.
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    a| Mode of access: Internet.
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    a| Satellites.
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    a| Optical materials.
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    a| Eubanks, A. G.
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    a| United States. b| National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
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    a| Goddard Space Flight Center.
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