Item Details

Free-Flight and Wind-Tunnel Studies of Deployment of a Dynamically and Elastically Scaled Inflatable Parawing Model

by Alice T. Ferris and H. Neale Kelly
Format
Book; Government Document; Online; EBook
Published
Washington, D.C. : National Aeronautics and Space Administration ; Springfield, Va. : Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific and Technical Information, 1968.
Language
English
Series
NASA Technical Note
Abstract
The deployment characteristics of a 1/8-size dynamically and elastically scaled model of an inflatable parawing suitable for the recovery of an Apollo-type spacecraft were investigated in free flight and in the Langley transonic dynamics tunnel using a model which was mounted to permit limited angular freedom. The deployments were of a passive type; that is, there was no powered reel-in or reel-out of the suspension lines. However, a braking system was used to attenuate the dynamic loads in the suspension lines. The deployment technique was developed in an initial series of wind-tunnel tests. By utilizing the equipment and technique evolved from the wind-tunnel studies, successful free-flight deployments were accomplished and the transient loads associated with the deployments were measured. These results were compared with the results of subsequent wind-tunnel tests.
Description
42 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Mode of access: Internet.
Notes
  • "September 1968."
  • "NASA Technical Note NASA TN D-4724."
  • "Langley Research Center Langley Station, Hampton, Va."
  • This work is part of the library's "Parachute History Collection", donated by the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. Institut für Flugsystemtechnik, through the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Aerodynamic Deceleration Systems Technical Committee.
  • Includes bibliographical references.
Series Statement
NASA technical note ; D-4724
Logo for No Copyright - United StatesNo Copyright - United States
Technical Details

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    a| Free-flight and wind-tunnel studies of deployment of a dynamically and elastically scaled inflatable parawing model / c| by Alice T. Ferris and H. Neale Kelly.
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    a| Washington, D.C. : b| National Aeronautics and Space Administration ; a| Springfield, Va. : b| Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific and Technical Information, c| 1968.
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    a| 42 p. : b| ill. ; c| 28 cm.
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    a| NASA technical note ; v| D-4724
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    a| "September 1968."
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    a| "NASA Technical Note NASA TN D-4724."
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    a| "Langley Research Center Langley Station, Hampton, Va."
    500
      
      
    a| This work is part of the library's "Parachute History Collection", donated by the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. Institut für Flugsystemtechnik, through the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Aerodynamic Deceleration Systems Technical Committee.
    504
      
      
    a| Includes bibliographical references.
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    a| The deployment characteristics of a 1/8-size dynamically and elastically scaled model of an inflatable parawing suitable for the recovery of an Apollo-type spacecraft were investigated in free flight and in the Langley transonic dynamics tunnel using a model which was mounted to permit limited angular freedom. The deployments were of a passive type; that is, there was no powered reel-in or reel-out of the suspension lines. However, a braking system was used to attenuate the dynamic loads in the suspension lines. The deployment technique was developed in an initial series of wind-tunnel tests. By utilizing the equipment and technique evolved from the wind-tunnel studies, successful free-flight deployments were accomplished and the transient loads associated with the deployments were measured. These results were compared with the results of subsequent wind-tunnel tests.
    538
      
      
    a| Mode of access: Internet.
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    0
    a| Wind tunnels.
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    a| Airplanes x| Parawings x| Models x| Testing.
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    a| Kelly, H. Neale.
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    a| Langley Research Center.
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    a| United States. b| National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
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