Item Details

Flutter at Very High Speeds

by Harry L. Runyan and Homer G. Morgan
Format
Book; Government Document; Online; EBook
Published
Washington, [D.C.] : National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1961.
Language
English
Series
NASA Technical Note
Summary
This paper is concerned with a discussion of some of the problems of flutter and aeroelasticity that are or may be important at high speeds. Various theoretical procedures for treating high Mach number flutter are reviewed. Application of two of these methods, namely, the Van Dyke method and piston-theory method, is made to a specific example and compared with linear two- and three-dimensional results. It is shown that the effects of thickness and airfoil shape are destabilizing as compared with linear theory at high Mach number. In order to demonstrate the validity of these large predicted effects, experimental flutter results are shown for two rectangular wings at Mach numbers of 6.86 and 3. The results of nonlinear piston-theory calculations were in good agreement with experiment, whereas the results of using two- and three-dimensional linear theory were not. In addition, some results demonstrating the importance of including camber modes in a flutter analysis are shown, as well as a discussion of one case of flutter due to aerodynamic heating.
Description
12 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Mode of access: Internet.
Notes
  • Report Number: L-1645.
  • Document ID: 19980228015.
  • "NASA TN D-942."
  • "Supersedes recently declassified NACA Research Memorandum L57D16a by Harry L. Runyan and Homer G. Morgan, 1957."--P. [1].
  • "Langley Research Center, Langley Field, Va."
  • "August 1961."
  • Cover title.
  • Includes bibliographical references (p. 9).
Series Statement
NASA technical note ; D-942
Other Forms
Also available from the NASA Technical Reports Server (http://ntrs.nasa.gov/). Address as of 4/11/07: http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19980228015_1998386519.pdf.
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Technical Details

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    a| Flutter at very high speeds / c| by Harry L. Runyan and Homer G. Morgan.
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    a| Washington, [D.C.] : b| National Aeronautics and Space Administration, c| 1961.
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    a| 12 p. : b| ill. ; c| 26 cm.
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    a| NASA technical note ; v| D-942
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    a| Report Number: L-1645.
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    a| Document ID: 19980228015.
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    a| "NASA TN D-942."
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    a| "Supersedes recently declassified NACA Research Memorandum L57D16a by Harry L. Runyan and Homer G. Morgan, 1957."--P. [1].
    500
      
      
    a| "Langley Research Center, Langley Field, Va."
    500
      
      
    a| "August 1961."
    500
      
      
    a| Cover title.
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    a| Includes bibliographical references (p. 9).
    520
      
      
    a| This paper is concerned with a discussion of some of the problems of flutter and aeroelasticity that are or may be important at high speeds. Various theoretical procedures for treating high Mach number flutter are reviewed. Application of two of these methods, namely, the Van Dyke method and piston-theory method, is made to a specific example and compared with linear two- and three-dimensional results. It is shown that the effects of thickness and airfoil shape are destabilizing as compared with linear theory at high Mach number. In order to demonstrate the validity of these large predicted effects, experimental flutter results are shown for two rectangular wings at Mach numbers of 6.86 and 3. The results of nonlinear piston-theory calculations were in good agreement with experiment, whereas the results of using two- and three-dimensional linear theory were not. In addition, some results demonstrating the importance of including camber modes in a flutter analysis are shown, as well as a discussion of one case of flutter due to aerodynamic heating.
    530
      
      
    a| Also available from the NASA Technical Reports Server (http://ntrs.nasa.gov/). Address as of 4/11/07: http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19980228015_1998386519.pdf.
    538
      
      
    a| Mode of access: Internet.
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    a| Airfoils. 2| nasat
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    a| Piston theory. 2| nasat
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    a| Thickness. 2| nasat
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    a| Shapes. 2| nasat
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    a| Mach number. 2| nasat
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    a| Aerodynamic heating. 2| nasat
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    a| Aircraft structures. 2| nasat
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    a| Structural analysis. 2| nasat
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    a| Rectangular wings. 2| nasat
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    7
    a| Aeroelasticity. 2| nasat
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    7
    a| Supersonic spees. 2| nasat
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    7
    a| Flutter analysis. 2| nasat
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    a| Morgan, Homer G.
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    a| United States. b| National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
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    a| Langley Research Center.
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    b| UIU c| UIUC d| 20141113 s| google u| uiug.30112106872127 y| 1961 r| pd q| bib

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