Item Details

Self-Assessment: Review and Implications for Training

John T. Breidert, Jeffrey E. Fite
Format
Book; Government Document; Online; EBook
Published
Alexandria, Va. : U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, 2009.
Language
English
Series
Research Report
SuDoc Number
D 101.60/2:1900
Summary
"Across the spectrum of self-assessment research, a topic of debate concerns the accuracy by which individuals can evaluate their own performance. While some research has found self-assessment to be an effective measure, the majority typically found it to be an under- or over-estimation of actual performance. Although the accuracy of self-assessment has seen skepticism, benefits have been well documented. The current review is the result of examination concerning self-assessment accuracy and utility. The literature was searched to evaluate the ability of trainees/job incumbents/students to accurately report their level of ability or performance. Upon examination of the self-assessment accuracy literature, problems arose concerning terminology and differential utilization of self-assessment. This review reports that self-assessment, as currently used, is generally inaccurate; but given appropriate consideration of the moderating variables and clarification of terminology, self-assessment accuracy could increase. The Army should utilize a continuum of self-assessment, considering domain and skill level as determinant factors. Self-grading could be useful for the introduction and training of new skills. Self-impression may be useful for assessing Soldiers' confidence, self-perception of personality or traits, and continuous performance appraisal. Implementation of the continuum has potential to improve training quality and skill retention throughout the Army."--DTIC
Description
viii, 30 p. ; 28 cm.
Mode of access: Internet.
Notes
  • "Army project number 622785A790."
  • "June 2009."
  • Cover title.
  • Includes bibliographical references.
Series Statement
Research report ; 1900
Other Forms
Also issued electronically via World Wide Web.
Logo for No Copyright - United StatesNo Copyright - United States
Technical Details

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    a| Includes bibliographical references.
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    a| "Across the spectrum of self-assessment research, a topic of debate concerns the accuracy by which individuals can evaluate their own performance. While some research has found self-assessment to be an effective measure, the majority typically found it to be an under- or over-estimation of actual performance. Although the accuracy of self-assessment has seen skepticism, benefits have been well documented. The current review is the result of examination concerning self-assessment accuracy and utility. The literature was searched to evaluate the ability of trainees/job incumbents/students to accurately report their level of ability or performance. Upon examination of the self-assessment accuracy literature, problems arose concerning terminology and differential utilization of self-assessment. This review reports that self-assessment, as currently used, is generally inaccurate; but given appropriate consideration of the moderating variables and clarification of terminology, self-assessment accuracy could increase. The Army should utilize a continuum of self-assessment, considering domain and skill level as determinant factors. Self-grading could be useful for the introduction and training of new skills. Self-impression may be useful for assessing Soldiers' confidence, self-perception of personality or traits, and continuous performance appraisal. Implementation of the continuum has potential to improve training quality and skill retention throughout the Army."--DTIC
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    a| Mode of access: Internet.
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    a| Student self-assessment.
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    a| Ability.
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    a| Industrial relations.
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