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1.

The Art of Ayurvedic Healing

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Anne E. Monius, Ph. D. (Assistant Professor, Department of Religious Studies, University of Virginia) outlined the concepts involved in the philosophy and practice of Ayurvedic healing; concentrating on the ancient and classic work of Charaka. James L. Krag, M.D. (Medical Director, Valley Community Services Board, Staunton, Virginia) discussed the use of Ayurvedic principles in approaching health care, especially in Psychiatry and the use of transcendental meditation.
DVD
1999
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
2.

Proposed National Health Care Systems: Potential Impact on Academic Medical Centers

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The panel looks at the issues related to efforts at cost containment at academic medical centers and the adverse impact some of these efforts could have on patient care and the training of future health care workers in these centers.
DVD
1989
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
3.

Science and Society: Global Health : The Poet and the Doctor, Understanding Leprosy in "The House Is Black"

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Farnaz Milani (Medical Student, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Class of 2004) showed a 20 minute film entitled: "The House is Black," a 1962 film produced by the Iranian poet, Forough Farokhzad. This film was made as an attempt to sensitize people to the reality of leprosy and a leper colony. Ms. Milani described her journey with this film, learning about people with leprosy, and working with the "Medicine in the Humanities" program at a time when she left medical school. Learning about the heart of people with leprosy and global health concerns, ignited her return to medical school and renewed her thirst for learning and approaching medicine wholistically.
DVD
2002
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
4.

Information Technology: Transforming Health Care in the New Century

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Jeff C. Goldsmith Ph. D. (President, Health Futures, Inc., Charlottesville, Virginia) spoke on the challenges and need for electronic information systems in the health care environment. Dr. Goldsmith discussed the Gartner Group's five generations of the computerized patient records, presented a framework for knowledge-driven care, explained the impact of broadband and XML, and ended with the continuum of data, information, knowledge, and wisdom.
DVD
2001
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
5.

Elevation, Inspiration, and Positive Emotions in Medical Settings

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Jonathan D. Haidt, Ph. D. (Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Virginia) hypothesized the psychological evolution of humans' perceptions/experiences of "disgust" versus "elevation." Dr. Haidt described "core disgust" as involving food, animals, and body products; "animal remainder disgust" as involving sex, envelope violations (i.e. deviations from a notion of an ideal state), and death; and "social extensions of disgust" as entering the realms of the interpersonal and socio-moral dimensions. Hierarchy, solidarity and the polarities of pollution and purity were also discussed in relation to the concepts of experiencing a disgust response ("a blurring of the human/animal divide") or an emotional elevation (i.e. "a blurring of the human/God divide").
DVD
2002
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
6.

Science and Society: Global Health Policy and Ethics : Bioterrorism and Bioethics

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William A. Petri, Jr., M.D., Ph. D. (Professor and Head, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia) presented several cases of persons with anthrax infection: (1) a 1970 Charlottesville, Virginia man, (2) the outbreak in Ekaterinburg, Russia, and (3) the 2001 case of Joseph P. Curseen. Dr. Petri discussed the use of ciprofloxacin; the first live vaccine for anthrax by Louis Pasteur (1881); and the current research needs to better understand the pathogenesis of anthrax infections and develop new treatments and therapies not requiring annual booster vaccinations. Jonathan D. Moreno, Ph. D. (Emily Davie and Joseph S. Kornfeld Professor of Biomedical Ethics and Director, Center for Biomedical Ethics, University of Virginia) spoke on the history and c [...]
DVD
2002
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
7.

A Generation of Crack Babies: Policy Approaches to Perinatal Substance Abuse

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Mary Faith Marshall, Ph. D.R.N. (Professor, Department of Medicine and Bioethics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City) discussed "The Charleston Policy on Cocaine Use During Pregnancy." In 1989, the Medical University of South Carolina instituted a program known as the "Interagency Policy on Management of Substance Abuse During Pregnancy," aimed at helping mothers quit their addiction and assure the safety of their fetus. Controversial ethical issues such as the right to refuse treatment, privacy, racism, and politics were highlighted. Marshall showed a twelve minute clip of a BBB film documenting this policy. Robert J. Boyle, M.D. (Professor, Department of Pediatrics (Neonatology), University of Virginia) commented on the cocaine craze of the 80's and 90's and the curre [...]
DVD
2002
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
8.

Anonymity Vs Continuity - Bringing the Patient Back Into the Doctor's Education

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David A. Hirsh, M.D. (Instructor in Medicine and Co-Creator/Co-Director, Harvard Cambridge Integrated Clerkship, Harvard Medical School and Cambridge Health Alliance, Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts) presented a case for medical school curriculum change and described the development of the Harvard Medical School Cambridge Integrated Clerkship program which incorporates a continuity of patient care approach.
DVDOnline
2010
Available Health Sciences (Service Desk)
9.

Building Life: The Promise and Challenges of Synthetic Biology

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Jason Papin, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia) provided a background on synthetic biology as it intersects with the fundamentals of biology, technological processes utilizing tools and techniques such as DNA sequencing, fabrication, modeling, and mathematical computation. Dr. Papin illustrated the applications of synthetic biology with research involving insulin, antimalarial compounds, and the development of animal and plant breeds that are resistant to disease. Michael Rodemeyer, J.D. (Lecturer in Science, Technology and Society, School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Virginia) discussed the ethical implications of "playing God," and concerns of biosecurity and biosafety within greater uncertainty and complexity.
DVDOnline
2011
Available Health Sciences (Service Desk)
10.

Mindfulness and Compassion Practices With the Seriously Ill: Research and Clinical Implications

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Susan Bauer-Wu, PhD, RN, FAAN (Nell Hudson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia) presented ways to bring contemplative practice and pro-social qualities (e.g. empathy, love, kindness, generosity, gratitude, forgiveness, etc. ) to the care of the seriously ill. She covered definitions, descriptions, and research on contemplative practices and mindfulness as well as discussed three important dimensions of mindfulness; attention, intention, and attitude. She also included thoughts on neuroplasticity and the ability for mental training in contemplative work that includes focusing attention, adapting to unexpected changes, monitoring and perceiving the environment, perceiving internal body sensations, etc.
DVDOnline
2011
Available Health Sciences (Service Desk)
11.

Moral Order and Illness: AIDS and the Construction of Identity

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"Sociologists approach health and illness as "social constructions," examining the ways that cultural and contextual factors influence the perception and treatment of human bodily conditions. From the sociological standpoint, well-being and disease are not simply dictated by biological states, but instead are shaped by the larger systems of meaning and institutional arrangements prevailing in society (1). How an individual experiences a disease is therefore more than a function of the disease itself--it is a compound reflection of the meanings attached to the disease, and the customary modes of responding to it, in the society in which they live." Robert Shea discusses his research and interviews with AIDS and HIV positive patients. The focus of his study was on "the way patients con [...]
DVD
1994
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
12.

Teen Pregnancy

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The panel discusses the issue of teen pregnancy as affected by the treatment of sex on television, in education and at home through parental values. They also examine: government policies and practices in developing contraceptives; strategies for health, education and job training programs in communities, schools and by private agencies; and the issues primary care providers face in coping with teenage pregnancies.
DVD
1992
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
13.

Values, Trauma Care and Other Observations: The Alpha Omega Alpha Lecture

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Dr. Trunkey, chairman of the Dept. of Surgery at Oregon Health Sciences University briefly reviews the history of trauma systems. He discusses trauma as a contemporary health and social problem and then focuses on 5 patient and societal components of a trauma system and what health professionals can do to improve the inadequacies of existing systems.
DVD
1992
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
14.

Affinities Between Medicine and the Visual Arts

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Dr. Southgate as senior contributing editor and cover editor for the Journal of the American Medical Association, has supervised cover selections (a color reproduction of a work of art) and accompanying essays since 1975. She discusses the growth of her interest in art and her thoughts on the relationships between medicine and the visual arts.
VHS
1991
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
15.

Affinities Between Medicine and the Visual Arts

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Dr. Southgate as senior contributing editor and cover editor for the Journal of the American Medical Association, has supervised cover selections (a color reproduction of a work of art) and accompanying essays since 1975. She discusses the growth of her interest in art and her thoughts on the relationships between medicine and the visual arts.
DVD
1991
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
16.

Entering a White Profession: Black Physicians in the New South, 1870-1920

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Mr. Savitt looks at the problems that new black physicians faced as they tried to open medical practices in a previously all-white profession in the postbellum period in the new South.
DVD
1993
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
17.

The Good Old Days - How Good Were They?

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Dr. Hunter draws upon his long career as a physician, teacher and former dean (UVa Medical School), and as a patient to talk about the practice and philosophy of medicine over the last 50 to 70 years.
DVD
1993
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
18.

The Epidemic of Violence: The Role of Guns

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The panel discusses the role of guns in the national epidemic of violence. Panelists present their views on the pros and cons of gun control.
DVD
1992
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
19.

Money for Organs: Could We Increase the Supply of Organs by Buying Them or by Rewarding Donors?

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The panel discusses the pros and cons of different proposals to use financial and other incentives in an effort to increase the supply of transplantable organs.
DVD
1992
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
20.

Literature and Medicine: The Work of William Carlos Williams

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Dr. Connelly and Ms. Finney comment on the pairing of literature and medicine in medical schools and residency programs. Professor Cushman then presents a case study in literature and medicine taking the life of William Carlos Williams, American physician and poet, as his text.
DVD
1990
Available Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)