You searched for:

Series
:
Medical Center Hour
x
855 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Race-Based Therapeutics

Loading...
Ruth Gaare Bernheim, J.D., M.P.H. (Associate Professor of Public Health Sciences; Director, Division of Public Health Policy and Practice, Department of Public Health Sciences and Associate Director, Institute for Practical Ethics, University of Virginia) introduced the new masters program in public health at the University of Virginia and the first speaker. M. Gregg Bloche, J.D., M.D. (Professor of Law, Georgetown University School of Law and Visiting Professor of Law, UCLA) described a frame work for describing medical advances with technological change driven by basic and clinical reseach along with economic factors and the marketing of health and health care in terms of race. Dr. Bloche illustrated this framework with the FDA approved BiDil used to treat heart failure in self-ide [...]
DVDOnline
2007
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
2.

Will You Vaccinate Your Daughter Against Cervical Cancer?

Loading...
Michael F. Rein, M.D. (Jordan Professor of Epidemiology in Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia) described the context of sexually transmitted diseases, in particular the human papillomavirus (HPV), and the reasons why a vaccine is favorable for the prevention of cervical cancer and genital warts. Mark H. Stoler, M.D. (Professor of Pathology and Clinical Gynecology, Associate Director of Surgical Pathology and Cytopathology, Department of Pathology, University of Virginia) discussed the results of a vaccine trial, Gardasil, which has shown positive protection against cervical cancer and genital warts.
DVDOnline
2007
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
3.

Doesn't a Bird Fly by?: Credibility and Surprise in Writing and Art

Loading...
Lincoln Perry, M.F.A. (Distinguished Visiting Artist, University of Virginia) described aspects of his creative process which concentrates on viewing the gaps between life and art and how this has been realized in his bifurcated and multi-panneled paintings. As an artist Perry is less concerned with credibility as he is with providing a surprise or shock and presenting an emotional credibility. Ann Beattie, M.A. (Edgar Allen Poe Professor of Literature and Creative Writing, Department of English, University of Virginia) shared her process of focusing on a subject for literary description, seeing objects in the periphery, and making the most ordinary into one of the most extraordinary. Perry showed selected images (his own and others) and Beattie read from her short fiction antholo [...]
DVDOnline
2007
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
4.

The Cultural Dimensions of Pain: Brain, Belief, Story

Loading...
David B. Morris, Ph.D. (University Professor, Program of Humanities in Medicine, University of Virginia) described his biocultural model of pain and how this model may help in understanding and managing pain in patients. Dr. Morris reviewed pychological, cross-cultural, historical, religious, social and pain-belief studies to illustrate his points. Nancy B. Eksterowicz, R.N.,M.S.N. (Pain Management Services Nurse Coordinator, University of Virginia) presented two cases illustrating the value of understanding pain in a borader/deeper, whole-person perspective.
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
5.

Dream Anatomies: The Cultural Meaning of Anatomical Representation

Loading...
Michael Sappol, Ph.D. (Curator-Historian, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland) discussed the development of anatomical representation from imaginative and fictious in the 16th and 17th centuries to the more present times in which it is more precise and realistic. Virginia Taylor Lyons, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor of Medical Education, Department of Cell Biology, University of Virginia) talked about the transitions of dissection from public to private and then beoming more public again through such initiatives as the National Library of Medicine's "The Visible Human Project." Both speakers described our fascination with the body and its anatomical representation for study, art, and entertainment.
DVDOnline
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
6.

Can We Teach Humanism in Medicine?

Loading...
Daniel M. Becker, M.D., M.P.H., M.F.A. (Professor of Medicine and Public Health Sciences and Director, Center for Humanism in Medicine) introduced the panel of speakers and the Center for Humanism. Mark J. Mendelsohn, M.D. (Associate Professor of Pediatrics, University of Virginia) defined humanism and gave some examples of its presence in the educational process. Eugene F. (Chip) Foley, M.D. (Associate Professor of Surgery, University of Virginia) described what humanism is and what it does and the importance of modeling humanistic behavior. Christine M. Peterson, M.D. (Director of Gynecology, Department of Student Health, Associate Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Assistant Dean for Medical Education, University of Virginia) presented a summary of key concepts and highligh [...]
DVDOnline
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
7.

Internal Bleeding: What We Need to Know and Do to Cure Our Epidemic of Medical Mistakes

Loading...
Robert M. Wachter, M.D. (Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, and Chief, Medical Service and Chair, Patient Safety Committee UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco CA, and William Parson Professor in Teaching Excellence, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Virginia) described how current sophisticated and complicated technology used in health care has contributed to the epidemic of medical mistakes. Dr. Wachter presented a case from his book ("Internal Bleeding: The Truth Behind America's Terrifying Epidemic of Medical Mistakes") as illustration and proposed solutions for prevention. Margaret L. Plews-Ogan, M.D. (Associate Professor and Chief, Division of General Medicine, Geriatrics and Palliative Care, Department o [...]
DVDOnline
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
8.

Engineering Activity Back Into Our Everyday Lives

Loading...
Arthur Weltman, Ph.D. (Exercise Physiology Laboratories, Curry School of Education, University of Virginia) introduced the problem of American's physical inactivity. Glenn Gaesser, Ph.D. (Program in Kinesiology, Curry School of Education, University of Virginia) described some major points concerning research and characteristics of fit persons. Nancy McLaren, M.D. (Department of Pediatrics and Teen Health Center, University of Virginia) discussed problems with pediatric patients and solutions for a public health approach. Timothy Beatley, Ph.D. (Department of Urban and Environmental Planning, School of Architecture) talked about the role of planning and designing of neighborhoods and communities in relation to physical fitness and connection with the natural environment.
DVDOnline
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
9.

How Doctors Think: Clinical Judgment and the Practice of Medicine

Loading...
Kathryn Montgomery, Ph.D. (Professor of Medical Humanities and Bioethics, and of Medicine; Director, Medical Humanities and Bioethics Program, Northwestern University) described what she has observed as differences in the way doctors and scientists think. Among the aspects Dr. Montgomery explored were: case based reasoning (the narrative), the process of research and logic, medical education, evidence based medicine, and physician values and ethics.
DVDOnline
2006
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
10.

Humanism? But Is It Medicine?

Loading...
Christine M. Peterson, M.D. (Director of Gynecology, Department of Student Health, Associate Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Assistant Dean for Medical Education, University of Virginia) briefly described the Gold Humanism Honor Society and introduced the new inductees. Eric J. Cassell, M.D., MACP (Attending Physician, The New York-Presbyterian Hospital, and Clinical Professor of Public Health, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY) provided a framework for proving that humanism is a part of medicine and that it can not be separated. He challenged the "patient-centered" phrase by showing that what is being taught or practiced is often "disease-centered" medicine. Dr. Cassell built much of his supporting argument for humanism in medicine by focusing on th [...]
DVDOnline
2006
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
11.

Conscientious Refusals by Health Professionals: Should There Be Limits?

Loading...
Robin Fretwell Wilson, J.D. (Visiting Professor of Law, Washington and Lee University Lexington, Virginia and Professor of Law, University of Maryland School of Law, Baltimore, Maryland) described and illustrated court cases that dealt with the conflicts between professional responsibilities and personal beliefs. Specifically Robin addressed: (1) The fact that both patients and providers have rights and expectations in a relationship; (2) Questions concerning whose rights are more important?; and (3) Debates concerning issues of health care access. Theresa S. Drought, Ph.D., R.N. (Assistant Professor of Nursing, University of Virginia) explored the ethical care of patients as seen in the nursing process and in the Nursing Code of Ethics. Daniel G. Larriviere, M.D., J.D. (Assistant [...]
DVD
2006
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
12.

Improvisation: What Does It Have to Do With Practicing Medicine?

Loading...
Stephen Nachmanovitch, Ph.D. (violinist, author, computer artist, and educator; owner of Free Play Productions, Charlottesville, Virginia ) began by playing an improvisational piece with Loren Ludwig (Graduate Student, McIntire School of Music, University of Virginia) who played the viola da gamba. Dr. Nachmanovitch described the similarities between medicine (physician patient interaction)/science and art and the process of creativity and improvisation which involves intense listening, openness, presence and communication. He concluded by stating that both medicine/science and art involve data gathering and experimentation which leads to the discovery of what works.
DVD
2006
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
13.

End of Life Care for the Poor

Loading...
Gregory Gramelspacher, M.D. (Associate Professor of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana) described the needs of the dying poor and the place of philanthropy. He read a poem by Jack Gilbert entitled, "By small and small: midnight to 4 a.m." to illustrate the importance of "presence" and communication with the dying person and their family. Dr. Gramelspacher postulated that good palliative care is preventive ethics consultation in practice. Through faces and stories of real people, Dr. Gramelspacher paints the picture of "dying well" both in Indianapolis and in Kenya. Rebecca Dillingham, M.D. (Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases and Internal Medicine, University of Virginia) shares her ambivalent thoughts regarding the dying [...]
DVDOnline
2006
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
14.

Into the Gap: Volunteering in New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina

Loading...
Four University of Virginia Health System staff members share their experiences and insights regarding volunteering in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Ross B. Isaacs, M.D. (Assistant Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine (Nephrology), University of Virginia) described his experiences and thoughts regarding race, poverty, and storms. Marcus L. Martin, M.D. (Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, Assistant Dean for Diversity, School of Medicine; and Assistant Vice President for Diversity & Equity, University of Virginia) presented a general background on the damage and destruction caused by the storm and the impact on the poor and minority populations. Audrey E. Snyder, M.S.N, R.N., FAANP (Clinical Nurse Specialist, Emergency Department, University of Virginia) p [...]
DVDOnline
2006
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
15.

The Neurobiology of Belief: Why We Believe What We Believe

Loading...
Andrew Newberg, M.D. (Director, Center for Spirituality and the Mind, Associate Professor, Departments of Radiology and Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania) defined and illustrated the types of beliefs that humans have and how and why we have developed them. Dr. Newberg discussed the parallel emotional, spiritual, religious, social, cognitive and health effects surrounding personal beliefs and described and showed brain imaging studies of meditation.
DVDOnline
2006
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
16.

Future Plagues: Evaluating and Responding to Natural and Man-Made Pandemics

Loading...
Paul Ewald, Ph.D. (Professor of Biology and Director of the Program on Disease Evoluation, Department of Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky) mapped out the ways in which infectious diseases emerge. Dr. Ewald described virulence evolution by looking at different kinds of pathogens and their potential to be servere and transmissible for creating harmful and acute diseases, such as those that are hospital acquired and sexually transmitted. For illustration, Dr. Ewald, detailed the 1918 influenze pandemic that occurred on the Western Front.
DVDOnline
2006
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
17.

Empathy for Health Care Professionals

Loading...
Richard M. Frankel, Ph.D. (Indiana University School of Medicine). Through visual illustration and lecture, Dr. Frankel described the changing role of empathy in medical care and the physician patient relationship; the value of empathy versus detached objectivity; current evidence for the efficacy of empathy; a model of empathy, and suggestions for cultivating empathy in learners and organizations.
DVDOnline
2007
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
18.

Corporate Ethics in Health Care: Where Has Trust Gone?

Loading...
Kem Hawkins (President, Cook Group Inc., and President, Cook, Inc., Bloomington, Indiana) shared his personal journey from public school band leading to the Cook medical technology company. He described the background and founder (William A. Cook and his friend Charles Dotter, M.D.) and the company's philosophy which has been built on honesty, transparency, and promise keeping. Kem Hawkins described what he saw as the current state of greed and misconduct in many United States biomedical and health care organizations.
DVDOnline
2007
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
19.

Big Doctoring: Primary Care in America-Essential and Endangered

Loading...
Fitzhugh Mullan, M.D. (Murdoch Head Professor of Medicine and Health Policy, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, D.C.) defined and traced the history of the concept of "primary care" in the United States. Dr. Mullan covered primary care values, policies, uses of the term, history, health reform, Title VII appropriations for the health professions and Medicare, patient context, and potential strategies for primary care renewal.
DVDOnline
2007
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
20.

The (Busy) Life of the Dead Body: A Conversation With the Author of Stiff: The Secret Lives of Human Cadavers

Loading...
Mary Roach (Independent author, Oakland, California) is interveiwed by Marcia Day Childress (Associate Profesor of Medical Education and Codirector, Program of Humanities in Medicine, University of Virginia) on her writing of "Stiff: the secret lives of human cadavers." Many issues surrounding the use of cadavers was explored, such as, cadavers as anatomy specimens, providers of organs and tissue for transplantation, forensic pathology studies, surgical techniques practice sites, crash-test or airline accident "victims," and as objects in exhibitions about the body. Concerns of "respecting the dead," ethics, research, social and cultural implications, and the media were also discussed.
DVDOnline
2007
Health Sciences (Service Desk)