Item Details

The Liberalisation of the Telecommunications Sector in Sub-Saharan Africa and Fostering Competition in Telecommunications Services Markets [electronic resource]: An Analysis of the Regulatory Framework in Uganda

Rachel Alemu
Format
EBook; Book; Online
Published
Berlin, Germany : Springer, [2018]
Language
English
Series
Munich Studies on Innovation and Competition
ISBN
9783662553183, 366255318X, 3662553171, 9783662553176
Summary
"This study investigates whether the existing regulatory framework governing the telecommunications sector in countries in Sub-Saharan Africa effectively deals with emerging competition-related concerns in the liberalised sector. Using Uganda as a case study, it analyses the relevant provisions of the law governing competition in the telecommunications sector, and presents three key findings: Firstly, while there is comprehensive legislation on interconnection and spectrum management, inefficient enforcement of the legislation has perpetuated concerns surrounding spectrum scarcity and interconnection. Secondly, the legislative framework governing anti-competitive behaviour, though in line with the established principles of competition law, is not sufficient. Specifically, the framework is not equipped to govern the conduct of multinational telecommunications groups that have a strong presence in the telecommunications sector. Major factors hampering efficient competition regulation include Uganda's sole reliance on sector-specific competition rules, restricted available remedies, and a regulator with limited experience of enforcing competition legislation. The weaknesses in the framework strongly suggest the need to adopt an economy-wide competition law. Lastly, wireless technology is the main means through which the population in Uganda accesses telecommunications services. Greater emphasis should be placed on regulating conduct in the wireless communications markets."--
Contents
  • Intro; Preface; Contents; Abbreviations; List of Figures; List of Tables; Chapter 1: Introduction; 1.1 Background of Research; 1.2 Statement of the Problem; 1.3 Main Objective and Research Questions; 1.4 Justification of Research; 1.5 Research Methodology; 1.6 Limitations of Research; 1.7 Structure of the Study; Chapter 2: Competition and Regulation of the Telecommunications Sector; 2.1 Rationale for Regulating the Telecommunications Sector; 2.2 Justifying Continued Regulation in the Fully Liberalised Telecommunications Sector
  • 2.3 Economic Characteristics of the Telecommunications Sector and Regulation; 2.3.1 Significant Economies of Scale; 2.3.2 Network Externalities; 2.3.3 Switching Costs; 2.4 The Market Characteristics in the Telecommunications Sector in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Implications for Regulation; 2.4.1 Substitution of Fixed Line Networks with Mobile Networks; 2.4.2 The Fading Dominance of Former State Monopoly Operator and Rise of Multinational Telecommunications Operators; 2.4.3 Network Infrastructure: Vertically Integrated Telecommunications Operators
  • 2.4.4 Outsourcing Tower Sites: Rise of Third Party Tower Companies; 2.5 Conclusion; Chapter 3: Liberalisation of the Telecommunications Sector: From Public Monopoly to Competitive Telecommunications Markets; 3.1 Rationale for Opening Up the Telecommunications Sector to Competition; 3.1.1 The Phasing-Out of the Natural Monopoly Theory Rationale; 3.1.1.1 Technology Change and the Natural Monopoly Theory; 3.1.1.2 Inefficient Monopoly Operator; 3.2 The Specific Factors Leading to the Liberalisation of the Telecommunications Sector in Uganda
  • 3.2.1 The Influence of Multilateral Development Institutions and Donor Agencies; 3.2.2 The Role of WTO; 3.2.3 The Growth of Mobile Market; 3.3 Evolution of the Telecommunications Policy from Monopoly to Competition; 3.3.1 Liberalisation and Privatisation; 3.3.2 Evolution of the Telecommunications Policy in Uganda from Monopoly to Competition; 3.3.2.1 Monopoly Era (1900-1993); 3.3.2.2 The Beginning of Competition (1993-1996); 3.3.2.2.1 Adoption of the Telecommunications Sector Policy Statement of 1996 and the Enactment of the Communications Act of 19...
  • 3.3.2.3 Privatisation of UPTC and the Duopoly Period (1998-2006); 3.3.2.4 Full Liberalisation and Telecommunications Policy of 2006; 3.3.2.5 Competition Concerns in the Fully Liberalised Telecommunications Sector; 3.4 Conclusion; Chapter 4: Regulating Anti-Competitive Conduct in the Telecommunications Market in Uganda; 4.1 Anti-Competitive Conduct in the Telecommunications Sector: Why Uganda Should Focus on the Mobile Market; 4.2 Regulating Anti-Competitive Behaviour: Economy-Wide Versus Sector-Specific Competition Rules; 4.3 Overview of Competition in the Telecommunications Sector in Uganda; 4.4 Main Telecommunications Markets in Uganda
Description
1 online resource.
Notes
  • Description based upon print version of record.
  • Includes bibliographical references.
Series Statement
Munich studies on innovation and competition ; volume 6
Munich studies on innovation and competition ; v. 6
Logo for Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

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